Course Information

Applied Human Biology (BTEC Level 3)

Applied Human Biology (BTEC Level 3)

Equivalent in size to one A Level. Eight units of which three are mandatory and two are external. Mandatory content (83%). External assessment (58%). 1 Principles of Applied Human Biology. 2 Practical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. 3 Human Biology and Health Issues. Options (x2) - Functional Physiology, Diseases, Disorders, Treatments & Therapies, Genetics & Genetic Engineering, Biomedical Science or Human Reproduction and Fertility.
Art & Design

Art & Design

Students will be introduced to a variety of experiences that explore a range of two-dimensional and/or three-dimensional media, processes and techniques.

Students will explore the use of drawing for different purposes, using a variety of methods and media on a variety of scales. Students will explore relevant images, artefacts and resources relating to a range of art, craft and design.  They should be aware of the importance of process as well as product.

Candidates will be made aware of the four assessment objectives and guided through an introductory 'learning' project for approximately 6 weeks and a major independent project.

Students will be given the opportunity to explore a wide range of materials, techniques & processes using the themes Abstract Portraiture and Ceramic Sculpture as starting points.

Opportunities include:

  • Drawing
  • Painting
  • Mixed-media
  • Sculpture
  • Ceramics
  • Installation
  • Printmaking
  • Photography
Biology

Biology

Core content

  • Biological molecules
  • Cells
  • Organisms exchange substances with their environment
  • Genetic information, variation and relationships between organisms
  • Energy transfers in and between organisms (A-level only)
  • Organisms respond to changes in their internal and external environments (A-level only)
  • Genetics, populations, evolution and ecosystems (A-level only)
  • The control of gene expression (A-level only)

Assessment

AS

Paper 1

+

Paper 2

What’s assessed?

Any content from Units 1-4, including relevant practical skills

What’s assessed?

·       Any content from Units 1-4, including relevant practical skills

Assessed

  • Written exam: 1hr 30mins
  • 75 marks
  • 50% of AS

Assessed

  • Written exam: 1hr 30mins
  • 75 marks
  • 50% of AS

Questions

  • 65 marks: short answer questions
  • 10 marks: comprehension question

 

Questions

  • 65 marks: short answer questions
  • 10 marks: extended response questions

A2

Paper 1

+

Paper 2

+

Paper 3

What’s assessed?

Any content from Units 1-4, including relevant practical skills

What’s assessed?

Any content from Units 5-8, including relevant practical skills

What’s assessed?

Any content from Units 1-8, including relevant practical skills

Assessed

  • Written exam: 2 hours
  • 91 marks
  • 35% of A-level

Assessed

  • Written exam: 2 hours
  • 91 marks
  • 35% of A-level

Assessed

  • Written exam: 2 hours
  • 78 marks
  • 30% of A-level

 

Questions

·      76 marks: short & long answer questions

·     15 marks: extended response questions

 

Questions

·     76 marks: short & long answer questions

·     15 marks: extended response questions

 

Questions

·     38 marks: structured questions, including practical techniques

·     15 marks: critical analysis of given experimental data

·     25 marks: one essay from a choice of two titles

 

Business

Business

A level in Business encourages learners to:

  • Develop an enthusiasm for studying business.
  • Gain a holistic understanding of business in a range of contexts.
  • Develop a critical understanding of organisations and their ability to meet society’s needs and wants.
  • Understand that business behaviour can be studied from a range of perspectives.
  • Generate enterprising and creative approaches to business opportunities, problems and issues.
  • Be aware of the ethical dilemmas and responsibilities faced by organisations and Individuals.
  • Acquire a range of relevant business and generic skills, including decision-making, problem-solving, the challenging of assumptions and critical analysis.
  • Apply numerical skills in a range of business contexts.

This A level specification introduces learners to the dynamic business environment and the importance of entrepreneurial activity in creating business opportunities and sustaining business growth. Learners will have the opportunity to develop a wide range of essential skills required for higher education and employment.

The focus of the specification is to nurture an enthusiasm for studying business using contemporary contexts, allowing learners to develop an appreciation of the strategic, complex and inter-related nature of business issues from a local to global perspective.

Teacher involved in lesson delivery – Mr D Gillespie

Chemistry

Chemistry

AS Chemistry

  • Physical chemistry 1
  • Inorganic chemistry 1
  • Organic chemistry 1

Year 13 Full A Level (+AS content)

  • Physical chemistry 2
  • Inorganic chemistry 2
  • Organic chemistry 2

Assessment

AS

Paper 1

+

Paper 2

What’s assessed?

·       Inorganic chemistry, with relevant physical chemistry

·       Relevant  practical skills

What’s assessed?

·       Organic chemistry, with relevant physical chemistry

  • Relevant  practical skills

Assessed

  • Written exam: 1hr 30mins
  • 80 marks
  • 50% of AS

Assessed

  • Written exam: 1hr 30mins
  • 80 marks
  • 50% of AS

Questions

  • 65 marks: a mixture of short and long answer questions
  • 15 marks: multiple choice questions

 

Questions

  • 65 marks: a mixture of short and long answer questions
  • 15 marks: multiple choice questions

 

A2

 

Paper 1

+

Paper 2

+

Paper 3

What’s assessed?

·       Inorganic chemistry, with relevant physical chemistry

·       Relevant  practical skills

What’s assessed?

·       Organic chemistry, with relevant physical chemistry

·       Relevant  practical skills

What’s assessed?

·       All content

·       All practical skills

Assessed

  • Written exam: 2 hours
  • 105 marks
  • 35% of A-level

Assessed

  • Written exam: 2 hours
  • 105 marks
  • 35% of A-level

Assessed

  • Written exam: 2 hours
  • 90 marks
  • 30% of A-level

 

Questions

·      105 marks: a mixture of short & long answer questions

 

 

 

Questions

·      105 marks: a mixture of short & long answer questions

 

 

Questions

·     40 marks: questions on practical techniques and data analysis

·     20marks: testing across the specification

·     30 marks: multiple choice questions

Computer Science

Computer Science

OCR A Level Computer Science
Criminology (Applied Diploma)

Criminology (Applied Diploma)

Year 1
Unit 1 – Changing Awareness of Crime.

This is assessed internally. The purpose of this unit is for learners to plan campaigns for change relating to crime:

  • LO1 Understand how crime reporting affects, the public perception of criminality
  • LO2 Understand how campaigns are used to elicit change
  • LO3 Plan campaigns for change relating to crime

Unit 2 Criminological Theories.

This is externally assessed. The purpose of this unit is for learners to apply their understanding of the public perceptions of crime and campaigns for change studied in Unit 1 with criminological theories to examine how both are used to set policy.

  • LO1 Understand social constructions of criminality
  • LO2 Know theories of Criminality
  • LO3 Understand causes of Criminality
  • LO4 Understand causes of policy change

Year 2
Unit 3 – Crime Scene to Courtroom.

This is assessed internally. Through this unit, learners will develop the understanding and skills needed to examine information in order to review the justice of verdicts in criminal cases.

  • LO1 Understand the process of criminal Investigations.
  • LO2 Understand the process for prosecution of suspects
  • LO3 Be able to review criminal cases

Unit 4 – Crime and Punishment.

This is externally assessed. The purpose of this unit is for learners to develop skills in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the process of social control in delivering policy in practice.

  • LO1 Understand the criminal justice system in England and Wales
  • LO2 Understand the role of punishment in a criminal justice system
  • LO3 Understand measures used in social control

You will be assessed through coursework (50%) and written examinations (50%)

Digital Media (Cambridge Technical)

Digital Media (Cambridge Technical)

OCR Cambridge Technical Digital Media Level 3

Students have the opportunity to study a range of topics from:

  • Unit 1 – Media products and audiences. Externally assessed
  • Unit 2 – Pre-production and planning. Externally assessed
  • Unit 3 – Create a Media Product.  Internally assessed
  • Unit 16 – The creation and use of sound in media.  Internally assessed
  • Unit 20 – Advertising media.  Internally assessed

Teachers involved in lesson delivery

  • Mrs Borrill Subject Leader for IT, Computing, Media, Business and Economics
  • Mr Gallagher Assistant Subject Leader of IT and Computing
  • Mr Gumbley
Economics

Economics

Our approach to Economics is to apply economic theory to support analysis of current economic problems and issues, encouraging students to appreciate the interrelationships between microeconomics and macroeconomics. The course has been closely developed with teachers and universities to develop engaging and up-to-date content that takes into account fundamental advances and changes in economic ideas.

Subject content -: AS

The operation of markets and market failure:

  • Economic methodology and the economic problem
  • Price determination in a competitive market
  • Production, costs and revenue
  • Competitive and concentrated markets
  • The market mechanism, market failure and government intervention in markets
     

The national economy in a global context:

  • The measurement of macroeconomic performance
  • How the macro economy works : the circular flow of income, AD/AS analysis, and related concepts
  • Economic performance
  • Macroeconomic policy
     

Subject content - A-level

Individuals, firms, markets and market failure:

  • Economic methodology and the economic problem
  • Individual economic decision making
  • Price determination in a competitive market
  • Production, costs and revenue
  • Perfect competition, imperfectly competitive markets and monopoly
  • The labour market
  • The distribution of income and wealth: poverty and inequality
  • The market mechanism, market failure and government intervention in markets
     

The national and international economy:

  • The measurement of macroeconomic performance
  • How the macro economy works : the circular flow of income, AD/AS analysis, and related concepts
  • Economic performance
  • Financial markets and monetary policy
  • Fiscal policy and supply-side policies
  • The international economy
     

Teacher involved in lesson delivery – Mr J Toland

English Language

English Language

Assessment – English Language

Paper

Unit Title

Assessment

AS %

A Level %

1

Language and the Individual

Written exam: 1 hour 30 minutes

50%

 

2

Language Varieties

Written exam: 1 hour 30 minutes

50%

1

Language, the Individual and Society

Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes

 

40%

2

Language Diversity and Change

Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes

40%

 

Non-exam assessment: Language in Action

Non-exam assessment

20%

English Literature

English Literature

AQA - English Literature (Specification A - 7711/7712)

 

Scheme of Assessment A Level

 
Assessment – English Literature
Paper Unit Title Assessment AS % A Level %
1 Love through the ages Written exam: 3 hours   40%
2 Texts in Shared Contexts Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes 40%
  Independent Critical Study: Texts across Time Non-exam assessment 20%
Fashion & Textiles

Fashion & Textiles

AQA Teacher Ms K A Woods A-level Design and Technology: Fashion and Textiles requires students to engage in both practicaland theoretical study.
  • Core technical principles
  • Core designing and making principles
  • Non-exam assessment (NEA)
  • Written exam
PAPER 1 What's assessed
  • Technical principles
  • Mathematical skills
How it's assessed
  • Written exam- Technical principles
  • 5 hours (30% of A-level) 120 Marks
Questions Mixture of short answer and extended responses of technical principles relating to fashion and textiles.   PAPER 2 What's assessed
  • Designing and making principles
  • Additional specialist knowledge
How it's assessed
  • Written exam- Designing and making principles
  • 5 hours (20% of A-level) 80 Marks
Questions Mixture of short answer and extended response questions Section A
  • Product analysis: 30 marks
  • Up to 6 short answer questions based on visual stimulus of one or more product(s).
Section B
  • Commercial manufacture: 50 marks
  • Mixture of short and extended response questions.
Non-Exam Assessment (NEA) How it's assessed
  • 50% of A-level
  • 100 Marks TOTAL
  • Identify investigate and outline design possibilities (30 Marks)
  • Design and make prototypes that are fit for purpose (50 Marks)
  • Analyse and evaluate (20 Marks)
Evidence You are required to undertake a substantial design and make task and produce a final prototype based on a context and a design brief developed by yourself. Written or digital design portfolio and photographic evidence of final prototype.
French
Exam board: AQA Title of specification: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/languages/as-and-a-level/french-7652 Teaching Staff: Miss Halliday, Ms Hamm. A-Level topic areas Social issues and trends
  • Aspects of French-speaking society: current trends (the changing nature of family; the ‘cyber-society’; the place of voluntary work)
  • Aspects of French-speaking society: current issues (positive features of a diverse society; life for the marginalised; how criminals are treated)
Political and artistic culture
  • Artistic culture in the French-speaking world (a culture proud of its heritage; contemporary francophone music; cinema: the 7th art)
  • Aspects of political life in the French-speaking world (teenagers; the right vote and political commitment; demonstrations and strikes – who holds the power? ; politics and immigration)
Literary texts and films You will study either two texts or one text and one film from the list provided by AQA. Individual research project You will identify a subject or key area that is of interest to you and relates to a country or countries where French is spoken. You will demonstrate that you conduct your research and analyse and summarise your findings. You will be asked to discuss your project during the speaking exam at the end of the course. Assessment All assessment takes place at the end of year 13. Unit 1: Listening, reading and writing A written exam lasting two hours and thirty minutes and worth 50% of the A-Level qualification. This paper will contain a range of questions to test your skills in reading, listening and writing. 100 marks available: Listening 30 marks, Reading 50 marks and Translation 20 marks. Unit 2: Writing A written exam lasting two hours and worth 20% of the A-Level qualification. This paper will test your ability to write two essays in French. You will write about the text(s)/film you have studied during the course. Unit 3: Speaking A spoken exam lasting between 21 and 23 minutes with an additional 5 minutes of preparation time. This exam is worth 30% of the A-Level qualification. This exam will test your ability to sustain a conversation about one of the four topics you have studied during the A-Level course, as well as your individual research project.
Geography

Geography

Specification - AQA Geography A Level
Geography is delivered as a 2 year course with no AS Level exams after the first year.

Unit 1:

  • Physical Geography (40% of final grade)          
  • Water and Carbon Cycles;
  • Systems and Landscapes;
  • Hazards.

Unit 2:

  • Human Geography (40% of final grade)
  • Changing Places;
  • Global Systems and Global Governance;
  • Contemporary Urban Environments.

Unit 3:

Geographical Fieldwork Investigation (20% of final grade)
Students complete an individual investigation which must include data collected in the field. The individual investigation must be based on a question or issue defined and developed by the student relating to any part of the specification content.

3000 - 4000 words.

Health & Social Care (BTEC Level 3)

Health & Social Care (BTEC Level 3)

Health & Social Care has been developed to provide a broad educational basis for further training, further education or for moving into appropriate employment within the Health and Social Care sector. Over the two year course students will study:

  • Human Lifespan Development (90 minute written exam, set and marked externally)
  • Working in Health & Social Care (90 minute written exam, set and marked externally)
  • Meeting Individual Care and Support Needs (Internal assignment)
  • Optional Unit - Sociological Perspectives (Internal assignment)
History

History

A Level History has three components:

Unit 1: The Quest for Political Stability in Germany 1871-1991 (Breadth Study) Students study issues of change, continuity, cause and consequence in this period through the key questions, such as: How was Germany governed and how did political authority change and develop? How effective was opposition? How and with what results did the economy develop and change? What was the extent of social and cultural change? How important was the role of key individuals and groups and how were they affected by developments?

40% of the overall A Level; written examination of 2 hours 30 minutes.

Unit 2: The Making of Modern Britain 1951-2007 (Depth Study) –  Students study in depth the key political, economic, social and international changes which helped to mould Britain in the second half of the 20th century. It explores concepts such as government and opposition, class, social division and cultural change.

40% of the overall A Level; written examination of 2 hours 30 minutes.

Unit 3: Historical Investigation. This is a 3000-3500 word essay based on a question in the context of approximately 100 years.  Students will develop an enhanced understanding of the nature and purpose of history as a discipline and how historians work.   It encourages students to undertake research and develop as independent learners and critical and reflective thinkers  It accounts for 20% of the A-level.

IT (Cambridge Technical)

IT (Cambridge Technical)

OCR Cambridge Technical Level 3 in ICT

  • Unit 1 Fundamentals of IT. Externally assessed
  • Unit 2 Global Information Systems.  Externally assessed
  • Unit 6 Application Design.  Internally assessed
  • Unit 8 Project Management.  Internally assessed
  • Unit 9 Product Development.  Internally assessed

Teachers involved in lesson delivery

  • Mrs Borrill Subject Leader of IT, Computing, Media, Business and Economics
  • Mr Gallagher Assistant Subject Leader of IT and Computing
  • Mr Gumbley
  • Mr Watt
Mathematics

Mathematics

Proof, Algebra and functions, Coordinate geometry, Sequences and series, Trigonometry, Exponentials and logarithms, Differentiation, Integration, Vectors,  Numerical methods, Statistical sampling, Data presentation and interpretation, Probability, Distributions, Hypothesis testing, Units in mechanics, Kinematics, Forces and Newton’s laws, Moments.

Music Performance (BTEC Level 3)

Music Performance (BTEC Level 3)

National Extended Certificate in Music BTEC Level 3 There are 3 compulsory components: Music Performance Techniques, Performing as a soloists and as part of an ensemble. 3 further modules will be selected that suit the needs of the learner. Students will study the following: Composing Music, Music in the community, Pop Music in Practice. Within these components the course will consist of Performing, rehearsing and managing yourself in an ensemble, studying basic music theory and harmony through different styles of music, writing about performances, practice routines and concerts, learning how to make your way in the music industry and further perform as a soloist and in an ensemble and complete your final portfolio as a musician.
Performing Arts (BTEC Level 3)

Perofmraing arts (BTEC Level 3)

Four units, of which three are mandatory and two are externally assessed. Mandatory Units: Investigating Practitioners’ Work Developing Skills and Techniques for Live Performance Group Performance Workshop Optional Units: Interpreting Classical Text for Performance Acting Styles Theatre Directing Screen Acting Developing the Voice for Performance Improvisation Movement in Performance Physical Theatre Techniques
Photography

Photography

Candidates will be introduced to a variety of experiences exploring a range of lens-based and light-based media, techniques and processes, including both traditional and new technologies.

Candidates will be made aware of the four assessment objectives and guided through an introductory 'learning' project for approximately 6 weeks and a major independent project.

Some of the topics covered are:

  • Portraiture
  • Landscape photography (working from the built or natural environment).
  • Still Life photography, (working from natural or manufactured objects).
  • Documentary photography, photo journalism, narrative photography, reportage
  • Photography involving a moving image, (television, film and animation).
  • New media practice such as computer manipulated photography and Photoshop techniques.

Candidates will be expected to learn the manual functions of the camera, lighting, apertures, macro photography and editing and to go out taking photographs in their own time. Candidates should also be willing to visit galleries or other relevant museums and exhibitions to conduct research.

  • There is no requirement for students to demonstrate drawing skills however a creative background would be an advantage.
Physical Education

Physical Education

Physiological Factors Affecting Performance (2 hours Exam – 30% Overall Mark) This group of topics focuses on key systems of the human body involved in movement and physical activity. Candidates will develop their knowledge and understanding of the changes within these body systems prior to exercise, during exercise of differing intensities, and during recovery. Application of this theoretical knowledge will enable candidates to understand how changes in physiological states can influence performance in physical activities and sport. Candidates will be expected to be able to interpret data and graphs relating to changes in these body systems during exercise of differing intensities and during recovery. Psychological Factors Affecting Performance (1 hour Exam – 20% Overall Mark) This component focuses on the psychological factors affecting physical activities and sports, including: models and theories that affect learning and performance in physical activities; how different methods of training and feedback work and why their effectiveness differs from person to person; group dynamics and the effects of leadership and stress on performers. Through the study of this component, candidates will gain a deeper understanding of the underlying psychological factors that influence our performance in physical activity and sport. They will learn how to apply the theories to practical examples, giving guidance and feedback in constructive ways that are suited to that individual’s personality; therefore, assisting in developing practical performance in physical activities and sports. Socio-cultural and Contemporary Issues (1 hour Exam – 20% Overall Mark) This component focuses on the sociological and contemporary factors that influence and affect physical activity and sport for both the audience and the performer and how sport affects society. It includes the emergence and evolution of modern sport and how social and cultural factors shaped the characteristics of sports and pastimes in pre-industrial and post-industrial Britain. The impact of the modern Olympic Games will be understood as well as the impact on society of hosting global sporting events. The ever-evolving modern technology and its influence on sport performers and spectators will be understood and practical examples will be used by candidates to show the effect of modern technology.   Performance within Physical Education (Externally Moderated – 20% Overall Mark) Learners will be required to undertake two parts within this component. Part 1: Performance/coaching of a sport or activity from the approved DfE list. Part 2: The Evaluation and Analysis of Performance for Improvement (EAPI)  
Physics

Physics

Core content

  • Measurements and their errors
  • Particles and radiation
  • Waves
  • Mechanics and materials
  • Electricity
  • Further mechanics and thermal physics (A-level only)
  • Fields and their consequences (A-level only)
  • Nuclear physics (A-level only)
  • Astrophysics (A-level only)

Assessment

AS

Paper 1

+

Paper 2

What’s assessed?

Any content from Units 1-5

What’s assessed?

·       Any content from Units 1-5

Assessed

  • Written exam: 1hr 30mins
  • 70 marks
  • 50% of AS

Assessed

  • Written exam: 1hr 30mins
  • 70 marks
  • 50% of AS

Questions

  • Short and long answer questions split by topic

 

Questions

  • 20 marks: practical skills and data analysis
  • 20 marks: from across all AS content
  • 30 marks multiple choice questions

A2

Paper 1

+

Paper 2

+

Paper 3

What’s assessed?

Any content from Units 1-4, and 6.1 (Periodic motion)

What’s assessed?

Thermal physics, fields & nuclear physics

What’s assessed?

Practical skills and data analysis

Astrophysics

Assessed

  • Written exam: 2 hours
  • 85 marks
  • 34% of A-level

Assessed

  • Written exam: 2 hours
  • 85 marks
  • 34% of A-level

Assessed

  • Written exam: 2 hours
  • 80 marks
  • 32% of A-level

 

Questions

·      60 marks: short & long answer questions

·     25 marks: multiple choice from content

 

Questions

·      60 marks: short & long answer questions

·     25 marks: multiple choice from content

 

Questions

·     45 marks: short and long answer questions on practical experiments and data analysis

·     35 marks: short and long answer questions on Astrophysics

 

 

Politics
Component 1: UK Politics Content overview 1. Political Participation, students will study:
  • democracy and participation, political parties, electoral systems, voting behaviour and the media.
2. Core Political Ideas, students will study:
  • conservatism, liberalism, socialism.

Written examination: 2 hours; 33⅓% of the qualification

Component 2: Governing the UK. Content overview 1. UK Government, students will study:
  • the constitution, parliament, Prime Minister and executive, relationships between the branches.
2. Non-core political ideas, students will study:
  • one idea from the following: anarchism, ecologism, feminism, multiculturalism, nationalism.

Written examination: 2 hours; 33⅓% of the qualification

Component 3: Comparative Politics Content overview USA, students will study:
  • the US Constitution and federalism, US Congress, US presidency, US Supreme Court and civil rights, democracy and participation, comparative theories. Written examination: 2 hours; 33⅓% of the qualification

Written examination: 2 hours; 33⅓% of the qualification

Psychology

Psychology

Topics of Study

AS Level

  • Social Influence
  • Memory
  • Attachment
  • Approaches in psychology
  • Biopsychology
  • Psychopathology
  • Research methods

A Level

Compulsory content

  • Issues and debates in psychology

Optional content

  • Option one - Relationships, Gender, Cognition & Development
  • Option two - Schizophrenia, Eating behaviour, Stress
  • Option three - Aggression, Forensic psychology, Addiction 

How will I be assessed?

There are two exams at AS each worth 50% of your AS qualification. Each exam lasts 1 hour 30 minutes and is worth 72 marks. The exams consist of multiple choice, short answer and extended writing questions.

At A-level there are three exams, each account for one third of your A-level. The three exams last 2 hours and are worth 96 marks each. The exams consist of multiple choice, short answer and extended writing questions.

Religious Studies

Religious Studies

Year 1

Philosophy of Religion: Arguments for the Existence of God, Evil and Suffering, Religious Experience.

Religion and Ethics: Virtue ethics, Divine Command Theory, Natural Law and its application to Abortion & Euthanasia. Utilitarianism and its application to animal welfare and nuclear proliferation. Situation Ethics and its application to homosexual and polysexual relationships.

A Study of Christianity: Jesus' Birth, Resurrection, the Nature of God, Trinity, Religious Principles, the Sacraments.

 
Year 2

Philosophy of Religion: The Challenges of Freud and Jung to Religion, New Atheism including challenges from Dawkins, Miracles, Religious Language.

Religion and Ethics: Ethical Egoism, Meta Ethics, Developments in Natural Law & Proportionalism from Finnis and Hoose, Free Will & Determinism

A Study of Christianity: The Early Christian Church, Study of the Person of Christ (Christology), Feminist Theology, Christianity in the UK, the Challenge of Science, Liberation Theology.

Spanish

Spanish

Exam board: AQA

Title of specification: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/languages/as-and-a-level/spanish-7692

Teaching Staff: Mr O’Loughlin, Mr Peers

A-Level topic areas

Social issues and trends

  • Aspects of Hispanic society (modern and traditional values; cyberspace; equal rights)
  • Multiculturalism in Hispanic society (immigration; integration; racism)

Political and artistic culture

  • Artistic culture in the Hispanic world (modern day idols; Spanish regional identity; cultural heritage or cultural landscape)
  • Aspects of political life in the Hispanic world (today’s youth, tomorrow’s citizens; monarchies, republics and dictatorships; popular movements)
     

Literary texts and films

You will study either two texts or one text and one film from the list provided by AQA.

Individual research project

You will identify a subject or key area that is of interest to you and relates to a country or countries where Spanish is spoken. You will demonstrate that you conduct your research and analyse and summarise your findings. You will be asked to discuss your project during the speaking exam at the end of the course.

Assessment
All assessment takes place at the end of year 13.

Unit 1: Listening, reading and writing

A written exam lasting two hours and thirty minutes and worth 50% of the A-Level qualification. This paper will contain a range of questions to test your skills in reading, listening and writing. 
100 marks available: Listening 30 marks, Reading 50 marks and Translation 20 marks.

 
Unit 2: Writing

A written exam lasting two hours and worth 20% of the A-Level qualification.

This paper will test your ability to write two essays in Spanish. You will write about the text(s)/film you have studied during the course.

Unit 3: Speaking

A spoken exam lasting between 21 and 23 minutes with an additional five minutes of preparation time. This exam is worth 30% of the A-Level qualification.

This exam will test your ability to sustain a conversation about one of the four topics you have studied during the A-Level course, as well as your individual research project.

Sport (BTEC Level 3)

Sport (BTEC Level 3)

This course is made up of 4 units; each unit will take 60 guided learning hours to complete. You will complete 4 units over the two years that will lead to a qualification worth 1 A Level. The units taught include: Unit 1: Anatomy & Physiology (externally assessed), Unit 2: Fitness Training & Programming for health, sport & wellbeing (externally assessed) Unit 3: Professional Development in the Sports Industry (internally assessed) Unit 5: Application of Fitness Testing (internally assessed). You will be taught by more than one teacher, each teacher will be responsible for teaching different units (or parts of a unit), so that means that you will be working on different units at the same time.  You will have to be well organised and remember to keep information in the right places in your folder.
Tourism (Applied Diploma)

Tourism (Applied Diploma)

Overview The travel and tourism industry is one of the fastest and growing industries in the UK. The value of tourism to the UK economy is approximately £126 billion, and the sector employs around 3.1 million people. Who is this qualification for? The WJEC Applied Diploma in Tourism is intended as an Applied General qualification. It is designed for post-16 students with an interest in tourism who want to continue their education through applied learning and who aim to progress to higher education. The qualification is equivalent in size to one A level and is designed to occupy one-third of a typical study programme, which could include other vocational or academic qualifications, such as another BTEC National or A levels. This qualification gives a broad introduction to the tourism industry, with an emphasis on core knowledge and fundamental skills that are transferable across other sectors. No prior study of the sector is needed, but students should normally have a range of achievement at level 2, in GCSEs or equivalent qualifications. What does the qualification cover? The aim of the qualification is to support progression to higher education, and the content has been developed in consultation with higher education providers to ensure that it supports this progression. In addition, employers and professional bodies have been involved and consulted, to confirm that the content is appropriate and consistent with current practice. The qualification provides the knowledge, understanding and skills that will prepare students for further study or training. The Applied Diploma in Tourism is made up of four units (360 GLH: two Certificate units plus two further units). All units are mandatory.

Diploma structure

Unit Title Assesment GLH
1 The United Kingdom Tourism Product External 90
2 Worldwide Tourism Destinations Internal 90
3 The Dynamic Tourism Industry External 90
4 Event and Itinerary Planning Internal 90

Extended Project Qualification (EPQ)

Extended Project Qualification (EPQ)

The Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) is a research-based qualification that can be undertaken in any subject area.  It allows students to develop and demonstrate skills in the following areas:
  • Project design, planning, and management
  • Research and use of resources
  • Data analysis
  • Critical thinking
  • Presentation design and delivery
  • Review and reflection